Guangzhou Olansi Healthcare Co., Ltd

A professional chinese air purifier,water purifier and hydrogen water machine manufacturer


Add: Floor 5, Building C5, Gaosha Industry District, Zhongcun, Panyu District, Guangzhou,China ( beside National Road 105 )
Tel:86-20-86000438
Fax:86-20-84713468
Email:daniel@olansgz.com
Webhttp://www.olansgz.com

Home > Water filter buying guide

 

Water filters have become simpler to install and more convenient to maintain. Our tests of various filters--everything from carafes to systems for the entire house--found models suitable for removing many common contaminants. What's at stake might be more than just good taste.
A flood of new filters--everything from simple carafes to permanently mounted systems--can make removing impurities from your drinking water almost as easy as turning on the tap. Some models that connect to the plumbing are now easier to install. And across types, more filters now feature electronic indicators that signal when it's time for replacement.
Dangerous contaminants such as lead, chloroform, arsenic, nitrate, nitrite, radon, and E. coli bacteria are common in tap water. Bottled water, often advertised as a "pure" and "natural" alternative to tap water, is generally safe. But it's actually less regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency than municipal water supplies. Indeed, some bottled water is simply filtered tap water. Fortunately, our tests of water filters of various types found models suitable for removing many such contaminants.
What's in your water?
One way to find out is to check your consumer confidence report, or CCR. The EPA requires utilities to provide a CCR to their customers every year. You may also find the CCR printed in your newspaper or posted on your local government website.
Our recent analysis of CCRs from the 13 largest U.S. cities revealed that few claimed to have no federal water-quality violations. Though none of the other water systems were consistently unhealthful, all had some samples containing significant quantities of contaminants. In New York City, for example, some samples had lead levels several times the federal limit.
Note that a CCR might indicate safe levels of a contaminant when your water actually has experienced potentially harmful spikes. Also, a CCR tells you about the water in your municipality, but not necessarily about what's coming out of your particular tap. Only testing your home supply can do that. Homeowners with a well on their property face even greater uncertainty, because such water isn't surveyed or reported on in CCRs. Call the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) for the names of state-certified testing labs or for your local health authority, which might offer low-cost or free test kits, or check out www.epa.gov/safewater/labs. Ultimately, you might find that you don't need a water filter.
It's important to know what contaminants are in your water that so you can match the filter to the problem. Claims about contaminant removal vary from product to product, so read the fine print. Also, consider how much water you consume vs. how much effort and disruption to your daily routine you're willing to tolerate. Generally, the more contaminants you need to remove, the more complicated the filter, though there are trade-offs.
How to choose
Fit the filter to your needs. If your family uses several gallons of water a day, for example, a single carafe-style filter would need constant refilling. And, read the fine print. Even within a specific type of filter, contaminant removal claims vary. So match the filter to the actual elements in your home's water supply. Pick a filter that is certified by the National Sanitation Foundation and designed to reduce the contaminants found. Then, check our Ratings to gauge the actual performance of each water filtration device.
Consider all the costs. All of the models we tested have filters that must be replaced periodically to function effectively. Our water filter Ratings take into account yearly filter replacement cost, which generally ranges from less than $20 to $400.

Water filters have become simpler to install and more convenient to maintain. Our tests of various filters--everything from carafes to systems for the entire house--found models suitable for removing many common contaminants. What's at stake might be more than just good taste.

 

A flood of new filters--everything from simple carafes to permanently mounted systems--can make removing impurities from your drinking water almost as easy as turning on the tap. Some models that connect to the plumbing are now easier to install. And across types, more filters now feature electronic indicators that signal when it's time for replacement.

 

Dangerous contaminants such as lead, chloroform, arsenic, nitrate, nitrite, radon, and E. coli bacteria are common in tap water. Bottled water, often advertised as a "pure" and "natural" alternative to tap water, is generally safe. But it's actually less regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency than municipal water supplies. Indeed, some bottled water is simply filtered tap water. Fortunately, our tests of water filters of various types found models suitable for removing many such contaminants.

 

What's in your water?

One way to find out is to check your consumer confidence report, or CCR. The EPA requires utilities to provide a CCR to their customers every year. You may also find the CCR printed in your newspaper or posted on your local government website.

 

Our recent analysis of CCRs from the 13 largest U.S. cities revealed that few claimed to have no federal water-quality violations. Though none of the other water systems were consistently unhealthful, all had some samples containing significant quantities of contaminants. In New York City, for example, some samples had lead levels several times the federal limit.

 

Note that a CCR might indicate safe levels of a contaminant when your water actually has experienced potentially harmful spikes. Also, a CCR tells you about the water in your municipality, but not necessarily about what's coming out of your particular tap. Only testing your home supply can do that. Homeowners with a well on their property face even greater uncertainty, because such water isn't surveyed or reported on in CCRs. Call the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) for the names of state-certified testing labs or for your local health authority, which might offer low-cost or free test kits, or check out www.epa.gov/safewater/labs. Ultimately, you might find that you don't need a water filter.

 

It's important to know what contaminants are in your water that so you can match the filter to the problem. Claims about contaminant removal vary from product to product, so read the fine print. Also, consider how much water you consume vs. how much effort and disruption to your daily routine you're willing to tolerate. Generally, the more contaminants you need to remove, the more complicated the filter, though there are trade-offs.

 

How to choose

Fit the filter to your needs. If your family uses several gallons of water a day, for example, a single carafe-style filter would need constant refilling. And, read the fine print. Even within a specific type of filter, contaminant removal claims vary. So match the filter to the actual elements in your home's water supply. Pick a filter that is certified by the National Sanitation Foundation and designed to reduce the contaminants found. Then, check our Ratings to gauge the actual performance of each water filtration device.

 

Consider all the costs. All of the models we tested have filters that must be replaced periodically to function effectively. Our water filter Ratings take into account yearly filter replacement cost, which generally ranges from less than $20 to $400.